British Folklore
Fairy Lore & Prehistoric Sites in Britain
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Mutiny Stones

Mutiny Stones

Known by various other names as well as the Mutiny Stones, the chambered cairn uphill from the Whiteadder Water is also called Mittenfu Stanes, Mittenfull of Stones, and Deil's Mitten - which all have a legend attached to account for its origin.

The devil had been employed to make a cauld on the Tweed at Kelso, and as it required an enormous amount of stones to carry out the work, he crossed the Lammermuirs to the sea coast at Dunbar and carried them on his back, and one some heavy journeys he stowed them carefully away about his person, and flew o'er the hilltops to his destination. In one of his journeys the night was dark, and there was no sign of the moon or stars, and through the murky air above he sped resolutely on his way, but miscalculating the position of one of the heights, he grazed one of his hands on the whinstone hillside, and thinking no more of this little accident, he reached a point above Byrecleugh, when his 'mitten' burst and down fell its contents, which to this day are called the "Mittenfu Stanes."

The account is from Glimpses into the Past in Lammermuir (1892) by John Hutton Browne, who added that another local belief was that underneath this huge pile of stones is the hide of an ox, filled with gold pieces that had been buried, and if anyone had the courage to dig for it the gold would be found there.